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I am a gay Diné (navajo), Hopi, Hispanic and mixed european college student currently struggling against destructive patriarchal systems.
Ehahlil's Dreamcatcher
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thenewwomensmovement:

chicken-mcniggletts:

stardusted:

Aussie Builders surprise public with loud empowering statements in new Snickers Australia Ad.

go australia

Too bad this was taken out of context and isn’t actually empowering at all.

19 hours ago on August 1st, 2014 | 681,164 notes
genderoftheday:

Today’s Gender of the day is: the unendingly vast and cold space between the stars

genderoftheday:

Today’s Gender of the day is: the unendingly vast and cold space between the stars

19 hours ago on August 1st, 2014 | 3,595 notes

(Source: iraffiruse)

19 hours ago on August 1st, 2014 | 32,006 notes
19 hours ago on August 1st, 2014 | 3,691 notes

atavar:

“She lied to you. She was protecting the last waterbender.”
"What? Who?"
"Me!"

(X) Most Powerful Moments in AtLA - No. 2

19 hours ago on August 1st, 2014 | 10,690 notes

(Source: carpediemtomorrow)

19 hours ago on August 1st, 2014 | 293,013 notes
everything-is-stickers:

How old is this photo.
Because it’s set up like Grandpappy sitting on the rocker telling the youngin’s about his youth.
But at this point in history it looks like one old guy took the only chair and made the rest of his elderly friends sit on the pavement because he’s the senior senior.

everything-is-stickers:

How old is this photo.

Because it’s set up like Grandpappy sitting on the rocker telling the youngin’s about his youth.

But at this point in history it looks like one old guy took the only chair and made the rest of his elderly friends sit on the pavement because he’s the senior senior.

(Source: gueasan)

20 hours ago on August 1st, 2014 | 79,285 notes

1. Your skin may never be perfect, and that’s okay.

2. Life is too short not to have the underwear, the coffee, and the haircut you want.

3. Everyone (including your family, your coworkers, and your best friend) will talk about you behind your back, and you’ll talk about them too. It doesn’t mean you don’t love each other.

4. It’s okay to spend money on things that make you happy.

5. Sometimes without fault or reason, relationships deteriorate. It will happen when you’re six, it will happen when you’re sixty. That’s life.

- Five things I am trying very hard to accept.  (via adrians)

(Source: aumoe)

1 day ago on July 31st, 2014 | 224,443 notes

(Source: proudones)

1 day ago on July 31st, 2014 | 214 notes

(Source: babybrando)

1 day ago on July 31st, 2014 | 3,333 notes

fashion-runways:

RAMI KADI Un Souffle d’Orient Collection

1 day ago on July 31st, 2014 | 41,036 notes
socimages:

Nope!
Brain studies find that concern for justice and equality is linked to logic, not emotion.
By Lisa Wade, PhD
A new study finds that people with high “justice sensitivity” are using logic, not emotions.  Subjects were put in a fMRI machine, one that measures ongoing brain activity and shown videos of people acting kindly or cruelly toward a homeless person.
Some respondents reacted more strongly than others — hence the high versus low justice sensitivity — and an analysis of the high sensitivity individuals’ brain activity showed that they were processing the images in the parts of the brain where logic and rationality live.   “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven,” explained one of the scientists, “Rather, they are cognitively driven.”
Activists aren’t angry, they reasonably object to unjust circumstances that they understand all too well.
Image borrowed from Jamie Keiles at Teenagerie, who is a high sensitivity individual.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

socimages:

Nope!

Brain studies find that concern for justice and equality is linked to logic, not emotion.

By Lisa Wade, PhD

A new study finds that people with high “justice sensitivity” are using logic, not emotions.  Subjects were put in a fMRI machine, one that measures ongoing brain activity and shown videos of people acting kindly or cruelly toward a homeless person.

Some respondents reacted more strongly than others — hence the high versus low justice sensitivity — and an analysis of the high sensitivity individuals’ brain activity showed that they were processing the images in the parts of the brain where logic and rationality live.   “Individuals who are sensitive to justice and fairness do not seem to be emotionally driven,” explained one of the scientists, “Rather, they are cognitively driven.”

Activists aren’t angry, they reasonably object to unjust circumstances that they understand all too well.

Image borrowed from Jamie Keiles at Teenagerie, who is a high sensitivity individual.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions, with Myra Marx Ferree. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

1 day ago on July 31st, 2014 | 31,955 notes

(Source: crooksh4nks)

2 days ago on July 30th, 2014 | 6,576 notes

politicalsexkitten:

Really funny how people making fun of immigrants speaking “broken english” only know one fucking language.

2 days ago on July 30th, 2014 | 140,947 notes
vineofficial:

This is fucked upThis fucked me up

vineofficial:

This is fucked up
This fucked me up

2 days ago on July 30th, 2014 | 657,730 notes